Stories, Profiles, Testimonials
Aaron

Aaron Harris
MOST Club Member

My name is Aaron Harris, and I am a veteran member of the Men of Strength (MOST) Club at Banneker High School in Washington, DC. The MOST Club empowers us to challenge our perceptions of masculinity. We learn the difference between a "real man," who is aggressive, selfish and violent and a "strong man," who stands up for what he believes in, gives back to his community, and treats others with respect.

I believe that a psychological evolution begins in the MOST Club, because we transform what it means to be a man by creating a safe and comfortable space to tackle issues that are difficult to discuss, like date rape, gender norms, and violence. My active involvement in this revolutionary program has been the sole catalyst for my maturation into a self-aware and confident young man.

 
MOST Club Testimonial
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Jonathan Babcock
MOST Club Member

“...I thoroughly enjoyed the time that I spent volunteering with Men Can Stop Rape. I have experienced new things and met new people that I never would have otherwise. I have become aware of issues that I did not know existed before, and I have changed the ways that view certain parts of society and life. Since being in MOST Club and talking about the issues that we talk about on a weekly basis, I have noticed that I have become more likely to voice my opinion about something that bothers me. For example, when my friends use derogatory language in reference to women, I take the time to tell them, “Hey man that’s not cool and I don’t want you to talk like that around me. I am serious I don’t like to hear that.” One of the statistics that I remember you reading to us in MOST Club stated that 81% of college aged males are uncomfortable with using derogatory language to refer to women. Yet men rarely step up and say that it is unacceptable. Through being a part of MOST Club I have realized that I am not alone in being offended by such language, and that I need to step up and voice my opinion when need be. I was texting my buddy from back home the other day and he jokingly called me a “pussy” in response to me complaining about finals and I responded telling him to try not to use words like that; that they are hurtful and derogatory. He was so surprised that I had reacted in the manner that I did, and I know that they reason I had the courage to say that word is unacceptable is from what I have learned from my time at Men Can Stop Rape. I know that I have become a better person and a better man by volunteering with Men Can Stop Rape.”